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Wednesday, August 12, 2020 | History

4 edition of School enrollment among non-slum, slum, and rural children in Kenya found in the catalog.

School enrollment among non-slum, slum, and rural children in Kenya

Frederick Mugisha

School enrollment among non-slum, slum, and rural children in Kenya

is the urban advantage eroding?

by Frederick Mugisha

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  • 1 Currently reading

Published by African Population and Health Research Center in Nairobi, Kenya .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 19-20).

StatementFrederick Mugisha.
SeriesAPHRC working papers -- no. 33
The Physical Object
Pagination20 p. :
Number of Pages20
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16930097M
LC Control Number2008349653

Mugisha, F () School enrollment among urban non-slum, slum and rural children in Kenya: is the urban advantage eroding? International Journal of Educational Development – Google Scholar | Crossref | ISI. higher in the slum communities of Nairobi compared to rural Kenya. While only 2 % of children living in the non-slum areas of Nairobi had diarrhea (Mboup, ), children living in the slums had the highest diarrhea prevalence in Kenya (33 % versus less than 20 % in rural areas and other cities). Further, prevalence of diarrhea is higher among.

(). School enrollment among urban non-slum, slum and rural children in Kenya: Is the urban advantage eroding? (). Seasonal dimensions to rural poverty. (). Seasonal effects on physical growth and development. In (). Mugisha, F. (). School enrollment among urban non-slum, slum and rural children in Kenya: Is the urban advantage eroding? International Journal of Educational Development, 26(5), – CrossRef Google Scholar.

  Background: High rate of unintended pregnancy (UPr) and childbearing among young women have always been reported in Nigeria. This study assessed the level of UPr and childbearing among unmarried out-of-school young women living in urban slums in Kosofe Local Government Area, Lagos metropolis, South-West, Nigeria. Method: > A cross-sectional community-based study was .   In terms of total student enrollment in the slum areas of the three zones, with schools, 76 percent of all schoolchildren attended either recognized or unrecognized private schools, with roughly the same percentage of children in the unrecognized private schools as in government schools (see Figure 1).


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School enrollment among non-slum, slum, and rural children in Kenya by Frederick Mugisha Download PDF EPUB FB2

Request PDF | School enrollment among urban non-slum, slum and rural children in Kenya: Is the urban advantage eroding. | Incl. graphs, abstract and School enrollment among non-slum. For long now, the urban child has been Author: Frederick Mugisha. Data from focus group discussions collected in the slums of Nairobi provide the context for discussion.

The results suggest that school enrollment is higher in urban non-slum than in urban slum areas, and is higher in slums than in rural areas at younger ages. However, this is only true up to age 9 for females and 11 for males, from which school enrollment for slum children declines and the rate of Cited by:   In this paper, this method is applied to the DHS for Kenya to generate an index of slum residence in examining school enrollment among slum, non-slum and rural children.

In generating the index, the effect of each indicator is by: This paper explores patterns of school enrollment comparing urban slum, urban non-slum and rural children. The paper uses data from the Kenya Demographic and. Mugisha F. School enrollment among urban non-slum, slum and rural children in Kenya: Is the urban advantage eroding.

Int J Educ Dev, ; 26(5), – Kırdar MG, Dayıoglu M. and Tansel A. Impact of sibship size, birth order and sex composition on school slum in urban turkey, Middle East. Rutstein SO. (Urban examples no. 19). Mugisha F. School enrollment among urban non- slum, slum and rural children in Kenya: is the urban advantage eroding.

Int JEducDev ; 7. Kenya National Bureau of Statistics. Kenya Demo- graphic and Health Survey Kenya Na- tional Bureau of Statistics, 8. United Nations Children's Fund. How Insecurity Impacts on School Attendance and School Drop Out Among Urban Slum Children in Nairobi Article (PDF Available) in International Journal of Conflict and Violence 2(1) June Multivariate analyses showed that compared with children in slum areas, those in non-slum areas were more likely to be attending school (odds ratio (OR) ; confidence interval (CI) - ().

School Enrollment among Non-Slum, Slum and Rural Children in Kenya: Is the Urban Advantage Eroding. School Enrolment Decline in Sub-Saharan Africa: Beyond the Supply Constraint. Schooling Citizens: A study of policy in practice in South Africa. Unpublished DPhil thesis.

Schooling for girls in rural Peru. Oketch, M., Mutisya, M., and Sagwe, J. Parental aspirations for their children’s educational attainment: Evidence from slum and non-slum residences. International Journal of Educational Development, 8.

[8] Mugisha, F. School enrollment among urban non-slum, slum and rural children in Kenya: Is the urban advantage eroding. F. MugishaSchool enrollment among urban non-slum, slum and rural children in Kenya: Is the urban advantage eroding. International Journal of Educational Development, 26 (5) (), pp.

Google Scholar. These informal slum settlement communities have a high GER (), though low compared to the non-slum (GER ) in The net enrolment rate (NER) during the same year is also low among the slum () compared to non-slum ().

The NER is slightly higher among the girls than boys both in the slum and non-slum. Mugisha F. School enrollment among urban non-slum, slum and rural children in Kenya: is the urban advantage eroding. Intern J Educ Dev. ; 26 (5)– doi: /ev [. Trinitapoli, J. & Regnerus, M. () Religion and HIV risk behaviors among married men: initial results from a study in rural sub-Saharan Africa.

Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 45. Highlights Parental aspiration for their children to achieve post-primary education is high in both the slum and non-slum areas. Parents in the slums aspire for lower levels of education for their children as compared to those in the non-slums. Parents in slums have high aspirations for their children and want them to attain high levels of education than their own.

Parental aspiration for. School enrollment among urban non-slum, slum and rural children in Kenya. International Journal of Educational Development, 26, - Google Scholar | Crossref | ISI.

* Though fewer rural high school students drop out of school than the state average, only 18 percent of these dropouts plan to get a GED. * One rural infant in five is born to a mother who used tobacco during pregnancy.

* There is one primary care doctor for every rural children. * There is one pediatrician for every 3, rural children. Mugisha F. School enrollment among urban non-slum, slum and rural children in Kenya: is the urban advantage eroding.

Int J Educ Dev. ; – [ Google Scholar ]. School enrollment among urban non-slum, slum and rural children in Kenya: is the urban advantage eroding. substance and drug use among urban slum adolescents in Nairobi Kenya.

Cities. Urban-rural differences in the socioeconomic deprivation–sexual behavior link in Kenya. Soc Sci Med. Mugisha F. School enrollment among urban non-slum, slum and rural children in Kenya: is the urban advantage eroding.

Intern J Educ Dev. ; 26(5): – Article. Nairobi slum villages were chosen for the study because although nationally, Kenya has areas with a high burden of STH infection, 29, 30 in Nairobi low prevalences have been found among primary school students in the city as a wh 32 and it had not yet been included in the national deworming program.

We hypothesized that infection. Kabiru CW, Beguy D, Undie C-C, Zulu EM, Ezeh AC. Transition into first sex among adolescents in slum and non-slum communities in Nairobi, Kenya. J Youth Stud. ;– Article PubMed PubMed Central Google Scholar.Haiti, India, Nepal and Niger, 4 out of every 10 slum chil-dren are malnourished, a rate that is comparable to rural areas of those countries.

• Likewise, in some cities, such as Khartoum and Nairobi, the prevalence of diarrhoea is much higher among slum children than among rural children. In slums, child deaths S Development Goals.